Bald Eagles a majestic raptor!

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        So last weekend I was out at Grant Farm’s neat St. Louis, Missouri, and there it was the most beautiful bird of prey in the world, the Bald Eagle. Bald eagles are indigenous to most of North America, and normally nest in non-human populated areas along rivers, lakes, marshes, with abundant fish life. The American Bald eagle has over 700 feathers on its body, and the male of the species weighs about 9 pounds, and the female approximately 14 pounds.

        The Bald Eagle is a thing of beauty in  the air, and has soaring speeds 35-42 miles an hour, and diving speeds 75-99 miles an hour. The Bald eagle was so named not because it was bald, but because of the white coloring in the feathers on the top of its head and neck. Their diet consists of mainly fish, birds, and mammals. They have even been known to bring cats back to their nests to feed. When feeding their young usually the stronger of the the eagle offspring survive and the strongest of the nestlings will bully the weaker of the two and gain the upper hand, until the other is malnourished and eventually dies.

       Eagle nests are usually large and have a cover from the foliage of no more than 60 percent and no less than 20 percent. Eagle nests have been recorded up to 10 feet in diameter, and 20 feet deep, and weighed over a ton. The breeding pair of Eagles is the only bird that once they find a mate will stay together for life.  A Bald eagles life span in the wild is usually 20 years, and the oldest recorded eagle in the wild was 28 years old.

      The Bald Eagle is the National Bird and National Animal of the United States of America. In the late 20th Century the Bald Eagle faced Extinction from the wild, and was extremely endangered due to hunters and poachers. Now because of modern science and people willing to help they were removed from the Endangered species list July 12th, 1995, and put on the threatened list instead. It was removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in the lower 48 States on June 28, 2007, and today there are over 15,000 breeding pairs alone in the United States. We should still fight to protect this beautiful bird, and all other endangered species including the African Elephant, and The Bengal Tiger.

     In order to protect such species places such as the World Wild Life fund have been set up for research and helping bring species back from the brink of extinction. If people donate to these funds or even volunteer time to help such causes, or even just make these causes known, our children, and grand children can enjoy the animals in the wild, and not just in a zoo, or in pictures in a science, or text book someplace. I urge all to please share and make sure we protect these birds and animals.

Thank you!!!